Posts Tagged infant

Warning About Sling Carriers for Babies

I just received this alert. I met it with mixed emotions. What do you think?…

NEWS from CPSC
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
Office of Information and Public Affairs
Washington, DC 20207

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 12, 2010
Release #10-165

CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

Infant Deaths Prompt CPSC Warning About Sling Carriers for Babies

WASHINGTON, D.C.- The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is advising parents and caregivers to be cautious when using infant slings for babies younger than four months of age. In researching incident reports from the past 20 years, CPSC identified and is investigating at least 14 deaths associated with sling-style infant carriers, including three in 2009. Twelve of the deaths involved babies younger than four months of age.

Slings can pose two different types of suffocation hazards to babies. In the first few months of life, babies cannot control their heads because of weak neck muscles. The sling’s fabric can press against an infant’s nose and mouth, blocking the baby’s breathing and rapidly suffocating a baby within a minute or two. Additionally, where a sling keeps the infant in a curled position bending the chin toward the chest, the airways can be restricted, limiting the oxygen supply. The baby will not be able to cry for help and can slowly suffocate.

Many of the babies who died in slings were either a low birth weight twin, were born prematurely, or had breathing issues such as a cold. Therefore, CPSC urges parents of preemies, twins, babies in fragile health and those with low weight to use extra care and consult their pediatricians about using slings.

Two months ago, the Commission added slings to the list of durable infant products that require a mandatory standard. Additionally, CPSC staff is actively investigating these products to determine what additional action may be appropriate. Until a mandatory standard is developed, CPSC is working with ASTM International to quickly complete an effective voluntary standard for infant sling carriers.

CPSC recommends that parents and caregivers make sure the infant’s face is not covered and is visible at all times to the sling’s wearer. If nursing the baby in a sling, change the baby’s position after feeding so the baby’s head is facing up and is clear of the sling and the mother’s body. Parents and caregivers should be vigilant about frequently checking their baby in a sling.

CPSC is interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are directly related to infant slings. You can do this by visiting http://www.cpsc.gov/cgibin/incident.aspx or call CPSC’s Hotline at (800) 638-2772.

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Breastfeeding Baby #2

Nursing our first child didn’t exactly start out easy. He had a double short frenulum. Because of that, he couldn’t extend his tongue over his gum line and he therefore “chomped” on me. I was cracked and bloody and cried every time. When he was 3 weeks old, Amber (my dear friend and one of our authors) checked out his latch again and recognized the short frenulum — her son had one too. She suggested that we have it checked out by an oral surgeon. We did so and that morning, his frenulum was clipped. That was the beginning of a wonderful 16 month breastfeeding relationship between my son and I.

I expected nursing to go somewhat easier this time. For the most part, it has. No cracked and bleeding nipples. No crying. I have had our share of rough nights, sore nipples, and poor latches, but I can’t complain. I don’t have intense pain like the first time. Now, beside the joy of providing nourishment to our son and the joy of just plain nursing him, in the fullness of the word “nurse,” I have found an adorable breastfeeding partner — our oldest child. Yes, the one that had the double short frenulum. He climbed up onto the couch, said, “nurse Elmo,” and that’s exactly what he did — nurse his baby! What a privilege we have as moms to NURSE our babies. It’s even better when our older children immitate us because they think it’s pretty special too.

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